Episode 9 : Coma - Page des fans de Twin Peaks
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Episode 9 : Coma

TWIN PEAKS
#2.002

story by
Harley Peyton

Scanned by runningdog.
Original formatting duplicated as closely as possible. For clarification all duplicate pages removed. Revised lines are red and the new lines will be gold. Special note: this is a faithfull duplication that includes the original spelling and series related errors.

Lynch-Frost Productions
7700 Balboa Blvd
Van Nuys, CA 91406
(818) 909-7900

REVISIONS:

July 7, 1990 – BLUE
July 11, 1990 – PINK
July 13, 1990 – GREEN
July 18, 1990 – YELLOW


 

ACT ONE


FADE IN:

1. INT. GREAT NORTHERN DINING ROOM – DAY

Morning. CAMERA MOVES slowly through the dining room, a walking POV. AGENT COOPER and ALBERT ROSENFIELD sit at a table up ahead.

ANOTHER ANGLE reveals this to be the POV of the ASIAN MAN. He continues, allows a waitress to seat him.

CUT TO:


2. INT. GREAT NORTHERN CORRIDOR – NIGHT

Cooper and Albert sit at the table arrayed with breakfast foods. Griddlecakes, orange juice, coffee. Cooper eats, expounds. Albert listens.

COOPER
Buddhist tradition reached the Land of Snow in the fifth
century A.D. The first Tibetan king to be touched by the
Dharma was Ha-tho-tho-ri gnyan-btsan. He, and all
succeeding kings were known collectively as the Happy
Generations. Some histories place the King in the water
snake year of 213 A.D. Others in 173 A.D. A water-ox
year. Amazing, isn’t it? The Happy Generations.

Cooper takes a sip of hot coffee, beams. Albert, deadpan, just stares for a very long beat. Then, finally:

ALBERT
Agent Cooper. I’m thrilled to pieces that the Dharma
came to King Ho-Ho and the Land of Schmoes. I really
am. But right now I’m trying hard to focus on the more
immediate problems of our own century. Right here in
Twin Peaks.

COOPER
(without malice)
You’d be surprised by the connections between the two.

ALBERT
Color me amazed.

COOPER
(on to business)
Ronette Pulaski has come out of her coma.

ALBERT
And?

COOPER
I’m thinking Ronette has quite a story to tell, once she
regains her ability to speak.

ALBERT
She’s not talking.

COOPER
Wakened, but silent. Probably shock.


Cooper pulls two police sketches out of his briefcase. Leo Johnson. And Bob, the long-haired man.

COOPER
(continued)
I intend to show her these.
(re appropriate sketch)
Leo Johnson. And Bob – the man Sarah Palmer saw in her
vision. The man who came to me in my dream.

ALBERT
(the usual sour sarcasm)
Has anyone seen ‘Bob’ on Earth in the last few weeks?

COOPER
Not yet.


Cooper takes a big bite of griddlecake. Albert produces a report, speaks while referring to it:

ALBERT
Fine. I performed the autopsy on Jacques Renault.
Contents of the deceased’s stomach revealed beer cans, a
Maryland license plate, half a bicycle tire, a goat, and a
small wooden puppet. Goes by the name of Pinocchio.

COOPER
(delighted)
You’re making a joke.

ALBERT
(deadpan)
I like to think of myself as one of the Happy Generations.
(back to report)
The killer snuffed the fat with a pillow. He was
Wearing gloves. Tape used to bind his wrists was stolen
from hospital supply closet. That’s all. If Jacques has any
secrets he’ll be taking them underground.

COOPER
The mill?

ALBERT
Preliminaries suggest arson. I nominate Leo Johnson.

COOPER
We need a statement from Shelly Johnson.

ALBERT
Hospital says she’s well enough.
(beat)
How do you feel?

COOPER
Me?

ALBERT
I believe it’s customary to inquire after the health of one
recently plugged with a thirty-eight. Three times.

COOPER
(almost touched)
Thanks for asking.

ALBERT
Don’t get sentimental.

COOPER
(back to business)
Who shot me, Albert?

ALBERT
My men are interrogating hotel guests. The usual bumper
crop of rural know-nothings and drunken fly fishermen.
No leads so far. The world’s most decrepit room service
waiter remembers nothing out-of-the-ordinary about the
night in question. No surprise there. Senor Drool Cup
has, shall we say, a mind that wanders. He –


The waitress interrupts, delivers a check. Cooper holds out a hand, signals he’ll pay for it. As Cooper signs his name and room:

COOPER
I appreciate your coming, Albert. We need the very best.

ALBERT
(confessing)
Dedication to duty isn’t exactly what brought me here,
Cooper.

COOPER
What is?

ALBERT
Windom Earle.


Cooper reacts with surprise. Muted trepidation.

COOPER
Agent Earle. He retired.

ALBERT
To a comfortable chair complete with wrist restraints at
the local laughing academy.

COOPER
What happened?

ALBERT
Nobody knows. Your former partner flew the coop,
Coop. Into thin air.

COOPER
(quietly)
That’s not good …


HOLD ON Cooper for a beat.

CUT TO:


3. INT. GREAT NORTHERN DINING ROOM – DAY

Across the room, someone is watching. It is the Asian Man. He looks long at Agent Cooper.

CUT TO:


4. EXT. HOSPITAL – DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:


4. INT. RONETTE PULASKI’S HOSPITAL ROOM – DAY

RONETTE PULASKI gazes at the ceiling with blank expression. ANOTHER ANGLE reveals Cooper and Truman at her bedside. A NURSE in the background. Cooper peers at the girl, then:

COOPER
Ronette?

The eyes move, nothing else, to acknowledge them.

Cooper produces the two police sketches, prepatory to showing them to her.

COOPER
Ronette, I’m going to show you some pictures. I want
you to tell me if you have seen these men before. I want
to know if they are the men that hurt you.

His words spark a memory, the memory brings pain. All in her dark eyes. Cooper holds the sketch of Leo Johnson toward her.

COOPER
Do you recognize this man?

A long beat. Then a surprise. Ronette’s arm lifts into the air, as if separate from the rest of her body. Cooper and Truman react. Ronette gingerly takes the sketch from Cooper, brings it closer to her eyes. As if to better view it. Cooper wonders:

COOPER
(gently)
Can you see, Ronette?

Ronnette nods, almost imperceptibly. She stares at the sketch for a long, long beat.

TRUMAN
Do you know him?

A long beat. Ronette proceeds slowly, as though underwater. Finally she nods. Yes.

COOPER
Is this the man that hurt you?

Another beat. Then, finally … she shakes her head. No.

TRUMAN
(confirming)
No.

Cooper takes the sketch from Ronette, holds out the second picture. The long-haired man named Bob. Again, Ronette reaches for it, brings the sketch toward her face. Near-sighted, this is the only way she can clearly see it.

SUDDENLY Ronette’s entire body seems to seize, her eyes dart about wildly.

COOPER
Ronette.

Ronette drops the sketch, her hand now knifes through the air, jagged motions, up and down, to the side, and up and down. The nurse hurries forward to aid or restrain. But Cooper intervenes.

COOPER
(to Nurse)
Wait.
(to Truman)
She’s trying to spell something. Paper.

Truman produces paper and pen, hands them to the girl. Ronette clutches the pen, begins to scrawl.

COOPER
Ronette. Is this the man that hurt you?

Ronette nods furiously as she writes, tears stream down her checks. She finishes, holds the paper toward them. Cooper takes it. They read.

ANGLE ON PAPER

Ronette’s fearful scrawl. TRAIN. LAURA. TRAIN.

BACK TO SCENE

TRUMAN
The train car.

But Cooper’s not listening. He’s staring at the sketch of Bob. The hard features. The long flowing hair. Meanwhile, Ronnette begins to moan. Softly at first. Then building to a terrified scream.

HOLD ON this tableau. Ronette upon the hospital bed. Cooper, Truman, and the nurse hovering about her.

CUT TO:


6: EXT. ONE-EYED JACK’S – DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:


7: INT. ONE-EYED JACK’S – DAY

The Get Acquainted Room. Early morning ease pervades. Girls lounge in robes, smoke cigarettes. Two blondes play checkers in a corner. A third girl, NANCY, the Pickup seen previously in Audrey’s room, sits and reads the morning paper.

AUDREY HORNE passes through the morning, looking for clues. She sits next to Nancy.

AUDREY
Morning.

NANCY
You say that as if it’s news.


Audrey lights up, ignores the rebuff, gestures toward the newspaper.

AUDREY
Well, what is news?

NANCY
Cookout at the Packard Mill.


Audrey peers at the banner headline: MILL BURNS. She reacts with unbridled delight.

AUDREY
Wow.

NANCY
Arson maybe.

AUDREY
(knowing)
I’ll bet. Nancy, do me a favor?
(off girl’s look)
I’m lookin’ for somebody.


Audrey produces a photograph torn from a high school yearbook. Ronette Pulaski.

AUDREY
We worked Spokane together. Shriners and stuff.

NANCY
Ronette.

AUDREY
(alert)
You know her?

NANCY
Sorta. Just a summer girl. She didn’t stay long.

AUDREY
(digging deeper)
Ronette had a friend. Laura. Ever see them together?


Suddenly: a male voice. It’s EMORY BATTIS. Battis enters the Get-Acquainted Room, pauses to greet familiar faces.

Audrey tamps out her cigarette, looks for exit.

AUDREY
Got to go. Maybe we can talk sometime.

With that, Audrey, rises, steps away. Nancy looks up from her paper, watches her leave. There’s a cold look in her eyes.

READING GIRL
Anything you say, ‘Miss Horne.’

Busted. Nancy turns her gaze toward Battis by the door.

CUT TO:


8. EXT. APARTMENT HOUSE – DAY

DONNA HAYWARD stands at the door, carrying a covered meal tray. She checks a piece of paper, doublechecks the address. And knocks.

DONNA
Hello? Mrs. Tremond? Meals On Wheels.

A long beat. Donna’s about to step away. Then a voice from within:

VOICE
Enter.

Donna hesitates, tries the door. It’s open. She hefts the tray, steps inside.

CUT TO:


9. INT. TREMOND APARTMENT – DAY

A shadowy interior. Pill bottles of every size and description on litter the room. An old woman, MRS. TREMOND, reclines in bed. A SMALL BOY stands before her. He wears a dark suit. The boy’s hands move gracefully through the air, perform a magic card trick. The old woman expectorates quietly into a handkerchief. She mutters.

TREMOND
Again.

The little boy repeats the magic trick. The old woman spits into the handkerchief, mutters. It’s as if Donna was invisible.

DONNA
Mrs. Tremond?

The old woman gestures toward a coffee table, more pill bottles, nearby.

TREMOND
Please.

Donna sets the tray upon the table, removes its cover. Reveals the meal beneath. The old woman shifts, peers down at the hot food.

TREMOND
Cream corn. “I requested no cream corn.

DONNA
Sorry.

TREMOND
We detest yellow food.

DONNA
Next time, I’ll…


As they speak, the little boy carries the tray to the old woman, arranges silverware. A playing card slips into view, settles amidst warm chicken and rice.

TREMOND
My niece is a nurse. Sent me hospital food. Can you
imagine?

DONNA
Uhm, no.

TREMOND
Tastes like paste. I ordered Meals On Wheels myself.
Laura Palmer brought them to me. She’s dead.

DONNA
I’m taking over Laura’s route.


The little boy cuts a piece of chicken, holds it toward the old woman. She takes the food in her mouth, chews slowly. Donna stands mute, ignored for the moment.

DONNA
Did you know her well?

TREMOND
No.


The old woman’s reply is abrupt, final. She does not desire further conversation. Donna sighs. She will learn nothing here.

DONNA
Enjoy your meal. I’ll remember the corn.

Donna steps toward the door. Suddenly:

TREMOND
Young lady.
(off her look)
You might ask Mr. Smith next door. He was Laura’s
friend. Mr. Smith does not leave his room.

DONNA
Thank you.


The little boy steps to Donna’s side. He produces a red rose, sleight of hand, and offers it to her. Donna smiles.

CUT TO:


10. EXT. APARTMENT HOUSE – DAY

Donna stands before apartment number 3, knocks. But no one answers. She scribbles a note, slides it under the door.

Donna steps back to her car. Behind her, hands gently part pale curtains. Someone watches her leaving.

CUT TO:


11. INT. BEN HORNE’S OFFICE – DAY

BEN HORNE sits at his desk, a mill ledger spread out before him. JERRY HORNE bounds about, nibbling on a block of cheese. Flames leap in the office fireplace.

Ben barks an order into the phone.

BEN
Tell Mrs. Horne I’m in a meeting.

Jerry pauses in front of Ben’s desk. Gestures. As if to make a formal presentation.

JERRY
Ben, I’m struggling for understanding. Evidence to be
examined. Two mill ledgers.

BEN
One fake, one real.

JERRY
The real?

BEN
Josie was running a loser.

JERRY
The fake?

BEN
Catherine was covering it up.

JERRY
Criminally.

BEN
To our advantage. With our consent.

JERRY
Which brings us to Andrew Packard’s will.

BEN
The ledger gambit guarantees the mill goes bankrupt, the
will gives Catherine the mill. Catherine sells to us and
pockets the cash.


The intercom buzzes, intrudes. Ben sighs, picks up the phone.

BEN
(into phone)
Now whit?! Tell her I’m still in a meeting.

Ben slams down the phone.

JERRY
So you promised Catherine the moon. Catherine eats
cheese instead.

Jerry offers Ben a bite from the block he’s holding. Ben shakes it off, replies:

BEN
Josie is a more than pliable business partner.

JERRY
Query: How pliable?

BEN
She gets the cash. We get the mill. And the land for
Ghostwood.

JERRY
I wonder … what does Josie really want?

BEN
(puzzled)
I don’t know. You?

JERRY
Stumped.

BEN
(using Jerry’s lingo)
Eternal Query: What do women want?

JERRY
Doublestumped.


Jerry’s pacing brings him back to the desk, the ledger spread out before him.

JERRY
(re ledger on desk)
So … which ledger is this?

BEN
The fake.

JERRY
Bad news for Catherine.

BEN
May flights of angels guide her to her rest.

JERRY
Bad news for us then.

BEN
If it went public.

JERRY
Let’s keep it private.

BEN
How private?

JERRY
Dust to dust…

BEN
Ashes to ashes.


Ben tosses the ledger to Jerry. Jerry tosses the ledger into the roaring fire. Both pause to watch it burn.

Just then: a harried SECRETARY marches into the office.

BEN
I told you I’m in a meeting!

The secretary interrupts, holds out a note for his perusal.

BEN
(re note)
Mrs. Horne?

The secretary nods, exits. Ben opens the folded paper, reads. A beat.

JERRY
Good news?

BEN
No. Audrey appears to be missing.

 

FADE TO BLACK

END ACT ONE

ACT TWO

FADE IN:

12. EXT. BLUE PINE LODGE – DAY

Establish. A Sheriff’s cruiser parked out front.

CUT TO:


13. INT. BLUE PINE LODGE – DAY

Cooper, Truman, and Albert gather about PETE MARTELL at the dining room table. Pete’s dazed, a little singed around the edges.

PETE
She was afraid. I’ve never seen Catherine afraid before.
Well. When we went camping she killed a snake. And a
tree hit me one time. She had a reaction.

Albert rolls his eyes. But Cooper preempts him with a stern glance. Pete produces an account ledger, places it on the table.

PETE
Catherine asked me to help her find the account ledger.
She asked me to help her.
(beat)
This was in her safe. Catherine said it was the wrong one.

TRUMAN
Josie showed me a second ledger.

ALBERT
(to Pete)
Sounds like your wife was cookin’ the books.

PETE
We couldn’t find it anywhere. But I found my high school
yearbook. Midge Jones.
(beat)
Midge had blue eyes like a robin’s egg. And a funny way
of walking. One foot here, one foot there, one foot here,
one foot there.

ALBERT
(he can’t help himself)
Feets don’t fail me now.
(beat)
Pete? Let’s make a heroic attempt to keep our minds, and
what’s left of yours, trained on the night in question. The
night the mill burned down.


Pete looks up, seems to see Albert for the first time.

PETE
I don’t like you.

COOPER
(gently)
No one does, Pete.

TRUMAN
(muttered)
Amen to that.

ALBERT
Well bounce my butt out of the Glee Club. Gentlemen,
I’ve got a job to do.

COOPER
(to Pete)
Did Catherine tell you what was in the ledger?

PETE
Heavens no. But she was desperate to find it. Until the
phone rang and she was gone. I saw her car out front. The
mill was burning. So I went inside …


Pete can’t continue.

COOPER
I’m sorry, Pete. We all are.

PETE
Have you found … her body?


Cooper shakes his head. No.

ALBERT
A mill fire burns somewhere close to two thousand
degrees, Mr. Martell. That’s hot enough to incinerate
bone.

Cooper places a reproving hand on Albert’s, stops him from continuing. Pete fixes Albert with a baleful stare. A beat. Then, in a whisper:

PETE
Catherine’s dead.

Pete sighs. Then stands, offers.

PETE
Let me get you boys some coffee.

Pete shuffles off toward the kitchen. Cooper and Albert trade conclusions. Truman watches quietly, as a spectator at a tennis match.

COOPER
Leo’s clothing reeked of gasoline.

ALBERT
Gas cans found at the hot spot matched those in the back
of his truck.

COOPER
Catherine hired Leo to burn down the mill.

ALBERT
She gets a phone call. From Leo?

COOPER
Maybe something went wrong.

ALBERT
Wrong enough. Mill burns. Catherine with it.

COOPER
I want Shelly Johnson. She can put Leo at the scene.
Catherine too.

INTERCUT WITH:


14. INT. BLUE PINE LODGE KITCHEN – DAY

Pete prepares coffee. Wipes a fugitive tear from his eye. The phone rings. He answers it.

PETE
Hello?
(beat)
Josie! Where are you?

Pete writes down her reply.

PETE
Harry and Agent Cooper arc in the living room with a
man I don’t like. I can –
(beat)
All right, Josie. I won’t tell a soul.

CUT TO:


15. INT. BLUE PINE LODGE – DAY

Meanwhile, Cooper and Albert continue. Truman spectates as before.

ALBERT
We need a look at Catherine Martell’s will.

COOPER
Who stood to benefit from her death?

ALBERT
Who gets the mill? Or what’s left of it.

COOPER
Life insurance.

ALBERT
I’ll run the policy for beneficiaries.


Albert turns to Truman, sneers at his silence.

ALBERT
Don’t be shy, Prince of Yokels. You too can participate in
the investigatory process.

Truman rises. Cooper grabs him by the arm. Just then: Pete interrupts.

PETE
(eyes on Albert)
Excuse me, boys. Coffee. Piping hot.

ALBERT
(muttered)
Morons and mooncalves, everywhere I go.


Pete carries a wooden tray into view. He speaks as he sets and pours coffee for four.

PETE
When I met Catherine, she was dating a fellow named
Rodney Pocquet. French-Canadian millionare’s son.
Rich as Croesus. Rodney never said it, but he looked
down on me. I know he did. And why not? Rodney in
his fine summer suits. Me in my overalls and boots. I
never minded all that much.
(beat)
Until he started talking rude to me. Like I wasn’t even
there. Rodney Pocquet hurt my feelings. He embarrassed
me in front of my friends. That made me mad.

Pete pauses, sets down the coffee pot. Albert wonders.

ALBERT
(with a sigh)
Is there a point to this insensate ramble?

PETE
Well, yes. There is. I hiked up to Rodney’s big house.
And I socked him on the jaw. Rodney never talked that
way to me again.


Albert looks to Cooper and Truman. He knows what’s coming.

ALBERT
Not again.

They nod. And Pete floors Albert with a slow right cross to the jaw.

CUT TO:


16. INT. THE DOUBLE R DINER – DAY

OPEN ON a police flyer. The official sketch of the long-haired man named Bob. And a headline. HAVE YOU SEEN THIS MAN?

ANOTHER ANGLE reveals DEPUTY ANDY BRENNAN as he carefully attaches the flyer to the inside of the Double R Diner doors. Andy’s using scotch tape to affix the paper flyer. He’s managed to get a piece caught in his tufted hair. LELAND PALMER and MADDY FERGUSON enter past Andy and move to a booth. Leland is resplendent in sharp suit, bright white hair, and a whole new attitude. He nearly beams.

LELAND
Best chocolate malteds this side of the Mississippi.

MADDY
I haven’t tried a malt here yet.

LELAND
Then I insist, dear. Simple pleasures. Life is too short.


NORMA JENNINGS approaches.

LELAND (CONTINUED)
Norma, two chocolate malteds, with a dollop of
whipped cream on the top.

NORMA
You’re looking well, Mr. Palmer.

LELAND
I’m feeling well, thank you.


Norma moves back to the counter. Leland recounts a happy memory.

LELAND (CONTINUED)
Laura’s favorite was a drink we used to call a Brown Cow.
It’s like a root beer float only made with a cola drink
and vanilla ice cream. She had her first, with me, in that
booth right there.

MADDY
I’m glad you’re feeling better, Uncle Leland.

LELAND
A man must take care of his family. And I still have a
family to take care of.


He reaches over, takes her hands. With pride.

LELAND (CONTINUED)
I’m coming through the pain, Maddy. I’m coming
through alive.

CUT TO:


17. INT. DINER – DAY

Behind the counter, Norma makes chocolate shakes. HANK JENNINGS enters the diner, moves behind the counter with a winning smile. Norma can’t help but return it.

NORMA
What are you grinning about?

HANK
You.

NORMA
Hank.

HANK
I look at you, and I feel a little tug at the edge of my
lips, right next to the kissing part. And before I know it,
I’m grinning again.

NORMA
(trying not to be charmed)
No sale; you’re thirty minutes late.

HANK
Okay, you found me out.


Hank produces a poloroid, holds it up for Norma to examine.

HANK
A 1965 GTO. Convertible. One owner. Forty thousand
miles. Clean and cherry.

NORMA
For what?

HANK
For you. It’s a surprise, honey. Well, it was.

NORMA
Where will we get the money? The diner’s barely
breaking even.

HANK
I put a little money away for something special. Trust
me, okay?

NORMA
(lightly)
Trust you?


Hank pulls Norma a little closer, brings his hips as close as propriety allows. Norma reacts, but she doesn’t move away. Hank nearly whispers.

HANK
It’s the car you always wanted, Norma. The car I said
I’d get you one day. Remember?
Tell me you remember, Norma.

Norma looks him right in the eyes, gently, but determined to resist him just the same.

NORMA
I remember.

With that she picks up the malteds and moves to Leland’s booth.

CUT TO:


18. INT. THE DOUBLE R DINER – DAY

Norma sets down the malteds.

LELAND
Thank you, Norma. Now, Maddy, a little piece of
heaven.

They try their malteds.

MADDY
Incredible.

LELAND
What did I tell you? Just another routine miracle of
everyday life here in Twin Peaks.

MADDY
Uncle Leland, you’re doing all the right things.

LELAND
What do you mean, dear?

MADDY
When Dad died two years ago, I thought I’d never get
over it. Mom never has. It was focusing on the little
things that got me through it. The “everyday miracles.”

LELAND
Life is a miracle. Maddy, I want to say something to
you, you don’t have to answer, in fact you shouldn’t. You
should think about it first. Promise first.

MADDY
Okay.

LELAND
You’ve said you don’t really have that much to go back to
in Missoula. You’ve also said how much you like it here.

MADDY
It’s true.

LELAND
What I want to say is: you don’t have to go back. You can
stay with Sarah and me if you like, get your own place, of
course, but stay in town. We’re family, too. We can
make a family here.

MADDY
(touched)
I don’t know what to say.

LELAND
You shouldn’t say anything until you eat that malted.


She smiles. They dig in.

CUT TO:


(19 & 20 ommited)

21. INT. THE DOUBLE R DINER – DAY

MAJOR BRIGGS enters and sits at the counter, enjoys a cup of coffee, a little contemplation. The LOG LADY appears, sits beside him. Holding, patting her log. She eyes the medals arrayed on the Major’s uniform.

LOG LADY
You wear bright objects on your chest.

MAJOR BRIGGS
(unfazed)
Yes. I do.

LOG LADY
Are you proud?

MAJOR BRIGGS
Achievement is its own reward. Pride obscures it.
Cream?


The Log Lady nods. Major Briggs adds cream to her coffee. She sips.

LOG LADY
My log has something to tell you. Do you know him?

MAJOR BRIGGS
I don’t believe we’ve been introduced.

LOG LADY
My log requires no introduction. Can you hear it?

MAJOR BRIGGS
No, ma’am. I cannot.

LOG LADY
I will translate.
(beat)
‘Deliver the message.’ Do you understand?


Major Briggs peers at the Log Lady with the usual impenetrable resolve. Then, a surprise:

MAJOR BRIGGS
Yes. As a matter of fact, I do.

CUT TO:


22. EXT. SHERIFF’S STATION – DAY

Establish.

CUT TO:


23. INT. SHERIFF’S STATION – DAY

Deputy Andy marches up to reception, LUCY MORAN behind the sliding glass. He pulls it open with a forceful tug. But Lucy glares …

LUCY
No messages, Deputy Brennen.

… and slams it shut. Undaunted, Deputy Andy throws the glass partition open a second time, even more forcefully. Lucy reacts with surprise.

ANDY
Listen to me, Lucy Moran. You just listen.
(a piece of tape still stuck to his head)
When the Tacoma Sperm Bank was looking for donors,
naturally I applied. But a routine physical revealed that I
was sterile. Sure, I thought it meant I didn’t have to
bathe, but the doctors told me the truth. They told me I
can’t have babies. So what I want to know now is why are
you having one? And how?

Lucy looks up at Andy, her lips quivering slightly. Then she reaches forward, as if to caress him. Andy reacts, leans closer … and Lucy TEARS the scotch tape from his head, closes the glass door one last time.

CUT TO:


24. INT. SHERIFF TRUMAN’S OFFICE – DAY

Hank Jennings stands and stares at the stag’s head mounted on the wall behind Sheriff Truman’s desk. There’s a placard beneath it that reads: THE BUCK STOPPED HERE. Suddenly, a voice behind him:

TRUMAN’S VOICE
Hello, Hank.

Hank turns to find Sheriff Truman and Agent Cooper enter the office.

TRUMAN
I’m betting Lucy asked you to wait outside.

HANK
Might’ve. You know me, Harry. I’m an impulsive guy.


Truman sighs, circles to his desk. Retrieves the appropriate form.

TRUMAN
I know enough not to waste my time on small talk. So
why don’t you sign in like a good boy, and keep your nose
clean for another week.

Hank stares at Harry for a long beat. There is bad blood between them. Then he signs without a word, turns on his heels, and steps out the door. A beat, then:

COOPER
How long were you and Hank friends?

TRUMAN
We grew up together. Ed, Hawk, Hank, myself.
Bookhouse Boys. Back then Hank was the best of us.
But he had a way of setting his heart on something, then
taking it. No matter how much it cost him. One day he
set his heart on Norma. And he took her from Big Ed.
“Never cheat a pal.” That was our code. Hank broke it.


An intercom beeper interrupts. Lucy’s VOICE is heard:

LUCY’S VOICE
Sheriff Truman? I have Ben Home on the phone for you.
The line with the light that’s blinking.

TRUMAN
Thank you, Lucy … hello? Yes, Ben … What? … Right away.


Truman returns the phone to its cradle. He looks up at Cooper, speaks with quiet urgency:

TRUMAN
Audrey Horne is missing.
 

FADE TO BLACK

END ACT TWO

ACT THREE

FADE IN:

25. INT. SHERIFF’S STATION – DAY

Harry escorts Ben out of his office.

BEN
I’d appreciate it if you would keep this quiet, Harry.

TRUMAN
I’ll do what I can. But…

BEN
Audrey has a penchant for the dramatic. The unexplained
disappearance, is, after all, a part of her repetoire. And
with Laura’s killer in custody, well, you understand. No
need to panic.


Harry knows different. But Ben’s attitude irks him just the same.

TRUMAN
I understand, Ben. We’ll be in touch.

Ben exits. Harry turns to find Cooper in the office doorway, watching with evident concern.

CUT TO:


26. INT. HOSPITAL ROOM – DAY

LEO JOHNSON stares at the ceiling. At the future, at the past, at nothing at all. His eyes
are blank and fathomless.

SHELLY JOHNSON stands with DOC HAYWARD at his bedside. She is dressed in hospital garb. Shelly peers at Leo with fear, muted revulsion. His death was something to be wished for. But this intermediate state is beyond Shelly’s ability to understand.

HAYWARD
The bullet lodged in Leo’s spine. We removed it
successfully. As for possible paralysis, it’s too early to
tell. Leo lost so much blood, most of it before we had a
chance to’ operate…
(beat)
I’m afraid tile resulting oxygen deprivation starved his
brain, induced the coma you see here.

SHELLY
He’s a vegetable?

HAYWARD
(with a sigh)
He is not in pain. Beyond that, it’s hard to tell.

SHELLY
Can you make him better?


Shelly’s tone suggests she’s not exactly pining for cure.

HAYWARD
We can maintain his current state. Offer him
nourishment, life support. But beyond that, our only ally
is time. I’m sorry, Shelly.

SHELLY
Me too. Arc they going to put him in prison?

HAYWARD
I know he’s suspected of several felonies. But he can’t be
charged with a crime until he’s conscious or ruled
competent to stand trial.

SHELLY
I guess, at the moment, he’s kind of in prison anyway.

HAYWARD
Yes he is.


She starts to cry, softly. Doc puts a comforting arm around her.

CUT TO:


27. INT. GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL LOBBY – DAY

Leland Palmer steps through the lobby. Full of life, new purpose, he nearly skips. A receptionist sees him pass by, doubletakes.

CUT TO:


28. INT. BEN HORNE’S OFFICE – DAY

Ben sits behind his desk. Jerry enters, tosses a document upon it.

JERRY
One life insurance policy. Unsigned.

BEN
‘Un’?!

JERRY
The agent said Catherine was concerned about “certain
irregularities.” Like naming Josie chief beneficiary.

BEN
The agent wasn’t supposed to show it to her.

JERRY
Considering Catherine’s toasty fate, for our side it’s just
as well

BEN
(tossing policy in trash)
Win a few, lose a few … let’s get those pickled Icemen on
the blower.


Jerry starts to dial internationally. Ben picks up an extension. Just then: a cheery shout at the door.

LELAND’S VOICE
Gentlemen!!

Ben looks up. Now what? Leland hops into the office, all smiles and manic energy.

LELAND
I’ve been giving this a lot of thought. The mill fire will
no doubt put contract signing on hold for the moment, so
we must insure that the moment, our moment, does not
pass. I would recommend a quick and cordialfollow-up
phonecall to Iceland, a little gentle handling, just to let
Einer know we’re on top of it.

JERRY
(deadpan)
We can handle that.


Just then: the call comes through.

BEN
Ben Home for Einer Thorson – Einer! (Icelandic phrase)
What’s that? You heard about it how? Mr. Palmer called
you to tell you about the fire?

Leland gives a big “ok” sign to Ben. Jerry rolls his eyes.

BEN (CONTINUED)
No, I wouldn’t call it a disaster at all. It was just one of
those things. An unfortunate development but I assure you
it in no way affects our developmcnt plans.

JERRY
Jerry Horne here, Einer. All systems go. Full speed
ahead.

BEN
Of course, Einer. We will fax you all the pertinent
details. Yes, Einer, immediately. Don’t you worry your
attractive little blond head about it, listen, in a meeting,
gotta run.


Ben puts down the receiver.

BEN
(weary)
Leland, here’s an idea, let’s take you off damage control
and have you concentrate on something you can handle,
like my tax return –

But Leland’s not listening. He stares at Ben’s desk, the police flyer upon it. Bob the long- haired man. HAVE YOU SEEN …?

LELAND
I know him.

BEN
Excuse me?


Leland picks up the flyer, stares at the sketch. His mood is suddenly quiet, pensive.

LELAND
My grandfather’s summer home at Pearl Lakes. He lived
next door. I was only a boy. But I know him.
(beat)
I must tell the Sheriff immedidately.

Leland turns on his heels and marches out the door. A beat, then:

BEN
I would like, I deserve, a little fun in my day. Nothing
complicated. No big deal. just a little fun.

CUT TO:


29. EXT. ONE-EYED JACK’S – NIGHT

Establish.

CUT TO:


30. INT. ONE-EYED JACK’S CORRIDOR – NIGHT

An attractive Fifty-Two PICKUP carries a bucket of ice down the hall. Audrey lingers outside a closed door, wonders.

AUDREY
I’ll take it from here. Tag team.

The Pickup shrugs, offers the bucket. And her free hand to ‘tag.’ Audrey slaps her palm, carries the ice inside.

CUT TO:


31. INT. ONE-EYED JACKS ROOM – NIGHT

Emory Battis sits in a comfortable armchair, feet up. He wears an Oriental robe, a Santa’s cap, and a silk scarf tied around his eyes. His toenails have been painted bright red, cotton balls between them as they dry.

Battis hears the door open, chirps:

BATTIS
Frosty? My little Snowman?

Audrey enters, sets the bucket at his feet. Battis, blindfolded, grins.

BATTIS
I feel a cold front moving in.

Audrey slips behind him, places her hands over the blindfold. Then slowly unties the knot behind his head.

BATTIS
Mmmm. Better. Visible sin.

Audrey lets the loosened scarf slip down about his chin. Then, before he can react – she pulls it tightly about his neck.

BATTIS
Hey!

AUDREY
Hiya, Mr. Battis. Remember me?


The voice, a glimpse of her face, tell Battis all he needs to know. He nods.

AUDREY
I’m gonna tell you a bedtime story. Are you listening?

With that she tugs the scarf a little tighter.

BATTIS
Yes. Yes.

AUDREY
Once upon a time there was this innocent little girl
named Red. That’s me. And she met a horrible wolf.
That’s you. And the wolf took her to a secret place and
did terrible things to her against her will. But the little
girl was tougher than she looked. She kicked the crap out
of the bad old wolf, and told her father all about it.
After that she told the police. And the bad old wolf
went to prison for a thousand years.


As she speaks, Audrey twists the scarf tighter and tighter. Now she releases it. Battis gasps for breath. At last:

BATTIS
What do you want?

AUDREY
I want to know everything you know. The perfume
counter. Laura Palmer. Ronette Pulaski. And One-Eyed
Jack’s.

BATTIS
You’re insane.

AUDREY
I’m Audrey Horne. And I get what I want. Understand?


Audrey moves as if to tighten the scarf again. Battis protests.

BATTIS
Yes. All right.

A long beat. Battis sighs. And begins:

BATTIS
I work for the owner of One-Eyed Jack’s.

Audrey pulls on the scarf. Whenever Battis hesitates, is tempted to lie, she reins him in.

AUDREY
(she knows)
Who is?

BATTIS
Your father. He owns it all. Hell, he owns everything.
(beat)
I run girls through the perfume counter. I recruited
Ronnette and Laura.

AUDREY
Did Laura come here?

BATTIS
One weekend. She was using drugs, we threw her out. I
never saw her again. I swear.

AUDREY
Did my father know she was here?

BATTIS
Yes. Yes he did. Mr. Home makes it his business to
entertain all the girls.

AUDREY
Did she know Jac owned it.?

BATTIS
Owned what?

AUDREY
One-Eyed Jack’s.

BATTIS
I don’t know. Yes. Yes, she probably did.


Audrey finally drops the scarf from his neck. The information – her father, Laura – troubles her deeply. Scares her too. A beat. Then, quietly:

BATTIS
Laura always got what she wanted. Just like you.
Understand?

The repetition chills her.

FADE TO BLACK

END ACT THREE

ACT FOUR

FADE IN:

32 EXT. HAYWARD HOUSE – NIGHT

JAMES HURLEY sits on a couch in the living room, holds a guitar in his hands. Donnna sits in a chair nearby, watches him play.

It’s a slow blues riff, snakes and ladders up the fret board. James concentrates with typically solemn expression, lost in the music. Then he looks up, sees Maddy return to the room with a soda.

Maddy smiles, sways to the music. Then, slowly, she begins to dance. It’s a sweet sudden moment. Maddy dancing across the carpet, hips rolling side to side, her body keeping time. James stares at Maddy. The sexy steps. The easy smile. It could almost be Laura dancing there.

Donna sees it too. She frowns, steps quickly from the room.

DONNA
Excuse me.

James abruptly stops playing. Maddy dances a single beat after, then freezes. James follows Donna toward the kitchen.

CUT TO:


33 INT. HAYWARD HOUSE CORRIDOR – NIGHT

James catches up to her in the hall. He takes Donna by the arm. Donna whirls violently about to face him.

JAMES
Donna, what’s going on?

DONNA
Nothing.

JAMES
Donna –


Donna interrupts with a passionate embrace. James resists at first. But Donna will not be dissuaded. She bites at his lips, offers soft kisses, then hard. James relents. And their embrace deepens, gives rise to whispered moans. And the fevered kiss continues.

Finally: James pulls away, quite breathless. He looks at Donna in the shadows, as if uncertain who is standing there.

JAMES
(confused)
Donna, what’s going on?

DONNA
(whispered)
I’m trembling, James. You made me.


Donna reaches for James, means to pull him back again. But a telephone rings OFF- SCREEN. Doc Hayward’s VOICE is heard.

HAYWARD’S VOICE
Donna. It’s for you. Harold Smith?

Donna reacts. Steps away.

CUT TO:


34. INT. HAYWARD HOUSE – NIGHT

Donna moves to the phone, answers.

DONNA
Hello? Mr. Smith?

SMITH’S VOICE
I received your note.

DONNA
I received yours.

SMITH’S VOICE
(beat)
Yes.
DONNA
(beat)
I’d like to talk to you.

SMITH’S VOICE
Tomorrow.

DONNA
Great. We can meet … ?

SMITH’S VOICE
Here. At noon. The time we meet is critical.

DONNA
Oh. Okay.

SMITH’S VOICE
Tomorrow, Donna. I will show you what Laura gave me.


He hangs up. Donna holds the phone for a beat. Now sees James standing in a doorway, wondering who she’s talking to.

CUT TO:


35. INT. HAYWARD LIVING ROOM – NIGHT

Maddy sits alone. She feels a chill, looks to her right.

ANGLE ON DINING ROOM (Maddy’s vision)

BOB, the long-haired man, sits-quietly at the dining, room table. Now he turns to face her, returns Maddy’s gaze.

BACK TO SCENE

Maddy screams. Donna and James rush back into the living room.

JAMES
Maddy!

James rushes to her side, takes Maddy into his arms. She’s nearly in shock.

JAMES
What happened?

DONNA
Are you all right?


Maddy turns back toward the dining room, afraid of what she might see. But the long
haired man is gone
.

CUT TO:


36. EXT. LEO JOHNSON’S HOUSE – NIGHT

Establish.

CUT TO:


37. INT. LEO JOHNSON’S HOUSE – NIGHT

BOBBY BRIGGS and Shelly sit entwined upon a couch.

SHELLY
It’s so weird. It’s like his eyes are empty but he’s looking
at something really far away. Like he’s remembering.

BOBBY
Weird.

SHELLY
I don’t want to be afraid of Leo anymore.

BOBBY
Bobby’s here, baby. You don’t have to be afraid.

SHELLY
Did you find out about the insurance?

BOBBY
I made a couple calls. Told ’em I was Leo’s cousin. Leo
gets his disability as long as he’s not in prison. It’s a lot
of money, Shelly, over five thousand a month. But you
only get it if Leo stays at home.

SHELLY
I don’t care about the money. I don’t want Leo home.

BOBBY
Leo’s in dreamland. We can stick him in a corner and
hang plants from his ears.

SHELLY
Sheriff Truman wants me to make a statement.

BOBBY
No way. Tell the Sheriff you got amnesia or something.
The fire twisted your brain.

SHELLY
I’m feeling pretty twisted right now.

BOBBY
They can’t force you to testify against your husband. All
you got to do is get Leo home. Then sit back and collect
the checks.
(beat)
Leo owes you, baby. Now we can really make him pay.
You want something nice? We can buy it. You wanna go
someplace special, sit in the sun? It’s on Leo.
Understand?

SHELLY
(warming to the idea)
It’d be nice not to worry about money. I got a shoebox
full of bills …

BOBBY
Bills. Forget about bills. We’re talkin’ about a new life
here.

SHELLY
(she knows the answer)
Together?

BOBBY
What do you think?


Bobby lifts Shelly’s hand to his mouth, kisses it. He gently sucks on a finger. Shelly sighs.

SHELLY
I think I want to get comfortable.

Shelly flows into Bobby’s arms, kisses him, playfully bites at his lip. Bobby hums with pleasure.

SHELLY
Bobby Briggs, I’m gonna eat you up.

BOBBY
Promise?

SHELLY
Just watch me.


Bobby and Shelly sink down upon the couch to make love.

CUT TO:


38. OMITTED

39. INT. AGENT COOPER’S HOTEL ROOM – NIGHT

START CLOSE on Audrey’s note to Agent Cooper, still hidden on the floor beneath his bed. A trilling musical scale is HEARD from above.

CAMERA REVEALS Cooper on his bed, shoes off, holding his handmade wooden flute. He pauses to glance at the television glowing in a corner. Then en activates the micro- recorder positioned on a bedside table.

COOPER
Diane, I received bad news today. Windom Earle has
vanished. Audrey Home is missing. There is of course no
connection, except for the simple fact that my former
partner’s disappearance seems to matter less to me than
that of a troublesome high school girl.
(beat)
Mr. Home is convinced she has run away and will return.
I wish I shared his confidence. Though not his callous
indifference.
(beat)
An all-points bulletin, routine checks of the train car and
Jacques’ cabin have revealed nothing. Not a trace of her.

Cooper shuts off the recorder. As if to wonder. Then he starts it again. Speaks more softly:

COOPER
Audrey’s absence touches me in ways I did not predict. I
find myself thinking not of clues or evidence, but of the
content of her smile. The way it gives the lie to her
delinquent posing, the hardened exterior which I suspect
is more a matter of self-preservation than a heart that is
cold. Audrey’s heart is warm.

Cooper flicks off the recorder. Sets it on his bedside table. just then: a knock at the door.

COOPER
Just a minute.

Cooper rises with a wince – his wounds still give pain – and steps to the door. The last time he opened it, Cooper received three slugs in the chest. This time he finds Major Briggs standing there.

COOPER
Major Briggs.

BRIGGS
May I come in?

COOPER
Please.


Briggs enters, Cooper gestures toward the room’s single chair. Briggs sits.

BRIGGS
I have a message for you.

COOPER
From whom?

BRIGGS
I am not at liberty to reveal the nature of my work. This
secrecy pains me from time to time. Any bureaucracy
that functions in secret inevitably lends itself to
corruption. But these are the rules I have pledged to
uphold. I believe a pledge is sacred.

COOPER
Speaking as both a man and a fellow employee of the
federal government so do I.

BRIGGS
I may reveal this much. Among my many tasks is the
maintenance of deep space monitors aimed at galaxies
beyond our own. We routinely receive various
communications, space garbage to decode and examine.
The results look something like this.


Briggs produces a paper readout, holds it out for Cooper to examine. The sheet is covered with letters, numbers, signifying nothing.

BRIGGS
Radio waves and gibberish, Agent Cooper. Until Friday
night. Saturday morning, to be exact.

COOPER
(to self)
When I was shot.

BRIGGS
The readout took us by surprise.


Briggs holds out another paper readout, the usual jumbled numbers and letters. And a message at its center: THE OWLS ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM. Cooper examines the message, wonders:

COOPER
Why did you bring this to me?

Briggs holds out one last readout.

BRIGGS
Later that morning.

Cooper looks at the paper. More letters, numbers. And something else, quite recognizable, repeated over and over. COOPER. COOPER. COOPER. Cooper reacts, exchanges a look with Briggs.

FADE TO BLACK


39A. OMITTED

39B. INT. COOPER’S HOTEL ROOM – NIGHT

FADE IN. The darkened bedroom. The phone RINGS. Cooper turns on a bedside light, answers it.

COOPER
(sleepy)
Agent Cooper.

AUDREY’S VOICE
I know who it is.

COOPER
(alert)
Audrey. Where are you?

AUDREY
Helping you. just like I said.

COOPER
This is not the time or place for schoolgirl games. I want
you to come home.

AUDREY
(with affection)
Keep your shirt on. I’ll be back before you know it.
Wait’ll you hear what I found out.

COOPER
Audrey, if you’re in any kind of trouble…

AUDREY
Trouble? Never.
(a teasing hint)
You look real cute in your tuxedo. Like a movie star.


With that she hangs up.

COOPER
Audrey? Audrey?

CUT TO:


40. INT. ONE-EYED JACKS – NIGHT

Audrey sets down the receiver. She turns, reacts. BLACKIE and Emory Battis stand before her.

BLACKIE
Trouble, Miss Home? You don’t know trouble. Not by
half.

Audrey looks left and right. No exit. Trapped.

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